An examination of the poem facing it by yusef komunyakaa

He's lost his right arm inside the stone.

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These lead the speaker to question his identity. Hero, who identifies himself with the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, is allowing us to understand the atmosphere of the event and the sorrow of people affected by war.

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Analysis The speaker is very sure of his identity, but later on, he thinks of it as a facade over which a few questions are raised as soon as he reaches the memorial.

The stone lets him go, as if it once imprisoned him, like the past perhaps?

Yusef komunyakaa poems

The sky. He worked for the military newspaper Military Cross during his stint with the armed forces in the Vietnam War. Works cited Marvin, Thomas F. When a bird flies off it seems there are brush strokes - are they too brushing away the names? Touching that name has ignited a memory, an instant image. He looks deeper into the memorial and begins to analyze the reflections of others. The title of the poem "Facing it" tells the reader that, while standing in front of the …show more content… Komunyakaa uses the image of Andrew Johnson in the poem, who was a member of the army infantry of hometown poet. I turn that way--I'm inside the Vietnam Veterans Memorial again, depending on the light to make a difference. The speaker thinks his name could be there, figuratively speaking, like smoke, which can just vanish into thin air. Especially, when these events are directly related to person, the memory reproduces every second of what happened. Lines seven and eight have enjambment, the lines not punctuated, bringing movement and some hesitation as the speaker uses the light to try and understand just what is happening to him inside and out. Here is a black man, a veteran soldier, come to view the war memorial, to use it as a mirror and so gain a little more understanding. Share quotes from famous books or tips for budding writers. The third and fourth lines deepen the sense of personal.

I go down the 58, names, half-expecting to find my own in letters like smoke. Here is the summary and analysis of the poem. He looks deeper into the memorial and begins to analyze the reflections of others.

I go down the 58, names, half-expecting to find my own in letters like smoke.

An examination of the poem facing it by yusef komunyakaa

This works both ways. The speaker experiences a loss of identity when he looks at the memorial, which is a granite wall, and his 'black face' is no longer differentiate from the wall. Created image clearly illustrates the loss and suffering, which are belonging to not the only one family. He, however, ends up breaking down as he is a human, 'flesh'. Metaphorically he's a window opening into the relived past. His reflection, caught in the shiny granite may appear to be stone; his own mind knows that this is not so. This makes his contemplation of the black granite memorial all the deeper as he has been able to find a clear moment to think alongside the chaos of D. On the one hand he is as tough as that granite, on the other he is as weak and sensitive as flesh. The idea that this black man told himself before he came to this place that he would not cry or shed a tear. His train of thought is broken because of the flapping wings of a bird, which he compares to a 'brushstroke'. He knows himself too well to fully commit to the notion that he is without emotions. In the black mirror a woman's trying to erase names: No, she's brushing a boy's hair. I'm stone. A plane in the sky. That is why the poem is dramatic.

Works cited Marvin, Thomas F. These concluding lines reveal to the reader that the narrator was part of the war in Vietnam. As the black soldier studies the granite surface and the names, he sees reflected a woman's blouse.

The poem tells the story about the violent war, which is difficult test for a person.

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“Facing It” Student Analysis